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ABOUT

A DIVERSE GROUP OF COMMUNITY-DRIVEN CHANGEMAKERS

SUPPORTING PROP 15

From our housing crisis to blighted commercial properties to an unfair tax system that discourages new business from entering the marketplace, come learn about how Prop 15 will help reshape California to build a better tomorrow.

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OUR STORY

POWER UP FOR PROP 15

Who We Are

 

Working in close coordination with the Yes on 15 Campaign, PICO California and LA Voice, we are a constellation of students, homeowners, parents, and grandparents who believe it is time to mend the devastating effects of Prop 13 on Schools and Communities.

 

Our Mission

Power Up parents, students, grandparents, homeowners and renters to educate and mobilize their networks to pass Prop 15. Prop 15, the ballot measure known as “Schools and Communities First” (SCF) will reform commercial property taxes and raise approximately $12 billion annually, 40% of which would be allocated to public K-12 schools and the remaining 60% would be distributed to California’s communities.

The effects of passing SCF would truly be transformational for our region and our State, increasing resources for our schools and for services such as parks, libraries, first responders, mental health, homelessness and street repair.

 

Supporting Prop 15

 

Prior to the passage of Proposition 13 in 1978, California generally ranked among the top ten states in per pupil K-12 spending (7th in 1977). California’s public schools were among the best in the country and its public university system was both world class and nearly tuition-free. At the same time, the State’s public services and infrastructure were second to none. All of this was funded by residential and commercial property taxes.

During this period, property tax rates were set at the county level and were applied to the market value of all properties. The average rate was 2.67%. Residential property owners paid about one-half of the property taxes in the State, with the remainder coming from commercial property owners. California experienced rapid growth in real estate values in the years leading up to Prop 13, and the “tax revolt” movement was born out of frustration with rising property tax bills. The signature image in the campaign for Prop 13 was a retired couple living on a fixed income, unable to afford rising property taxes on their family home.